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Wednesday, June 15, 2016

Lexington, Kentucky



Sometimes you find lots more than you were looking for. Last weekend, we drove out of Cincinnati, headed to Louisville. Suddenly, our GPS popped up an alternate route due to heavy traffic. We found ourselves headed to Lexington instead.

Most of us know that Lexington is the horse capital of the state. We saw some beautiful horse farms on the outskirts of town but I had decided to check out the Visitors Center downtown. Their website (http://www.kentuckytourism.com) said to look for the awning with the blue horse. Once inside, I found a life-size blue horse decorated with Kentucky attractions.

At the suggestion of a friendly guide, we decided to check out the downtown area. Unfortunately, we'd already had lunch so we simply walked past several local restaurants. We stopped at the girlhood home of Mary Todd Lincoln. In her early childhood, she had lived in a home across the street that is no longer standing.
Mary Todd Lincoln's home



Since I love old buildings, we headed to the pre-Civil War section of town
on Mill Street. The area, known as the Gratz Park Historic District, is home to many structures built in the early 1800s. I'll feature just two of the twenty-five buildings.



Henry Clay's law office



Henry Clay, a US Senator and Secretary of State under President John Quincy Adams, started his career as a lawyer. His law office, built in 1803, is one of only a few surviving professional buildings from that period. The Gratz Park brochure suggests that he probably interviewed Aaron Burr in this office.



First Presbyterian Church

Next to it stands the First Presbyterian Church,  built in 1872. This beautiful church is home to one of Lexington's oldest congregations, tracing its beginnings to 1784.

Whether you're interested in historic buildings, the Civil War, horses, museums, the Underground Railroad or wildlife, you'll find it covered in Lexington or the surrounding area.




Unfortunately, we were on a deadline to get home, so now I want to go back to Lexington and discover many of the attractions I missed.


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